Posts Tagged ‘mind’

Mind in Greater Manchester announce emergency services mental health programme

Friday, June 29th, 2018

Mind in Greater Manchester have this week announced their new ‘Blue Light Programme’, which aims to improve emergency service staff mental wellbeing by providing unique services, and destigmatising mental health among workers in the region.

Available to all Greater Manchester fire, police, ambulance and search and rescue personnel, the programme offers staff eight unique interventions from a menu of services– including mindfulness, counselling and CBT therapy – which have been specifically designed to help individuals manage stress, build resilience and identify trauma.

Mind in Salford are one of the five local Mind organisations involved in the delivering the programme, which the organisation hopes will provide a much-needed layer of support for emergency services personnel. Chief Exec, Markus Greenwood, stressed how important it is that staff have access to such services:

‘’This is a wonderful opportunity for Mind to help support our emergency services. They do fantastic work but it can be very stressful at times and we all need help when things are tough. We have a menu of tried and tested services on offer that will give a choice of interventions to help with stress and promote resilience for the personnel of these vital services.’’

 

The programme is open to any member of Greater Manchester’s emergency services, regardless of their position or situation.

As a national charity, Mind have championed equality between mental and physical health for years, and are still a key figurehead in the push for better mental health support in workplaces. More recently, the organisation has identified emergency staff as a specific group that is more at risk of experiencing mental ill-health – their latest research finding that 87.57% of personnel said they had experienced stress and poor mental health. Subsequently, the charity has committed £4 million to be spent exclusively on ‘Blue Light’ services since 2015.

Rob Potts, Assistant Chief Constable at Greater Manchester Police said: “The wellbeing of our employees is paramount within a workforce that is frequently exposed to difficult, stressful and traumatic situations.

“The Blue Light programme will help the way we change GMP, creating a work place environment that challenges the stigma surrounding mental health issues, whilst providing the best support and advice and ensuring we are all given the opportunity to reach our full potential.”

 

Who are Mind in Greater Manchester?

Established this year, the organisation is a partnership of Greater Manchester’s five local Minds, working together to ensure people experience better mental health, and support people to live well and feel valued in their communities and at work. By pooling their expert resources, the organisation hopes to offer targeted support that will dispel stigma and empower staff to overcome personal mental health struggles.

As well as the provision of services, Mind in Greater Manchester have declared clear intentions to put mental health front-and-centre of the region’s social, political and commercial landscape by campaigning for change and delivering workplace training together.

Mind in Greater Manchester Coordinator, Stuart Lucas, this week outlined the organisation’s desire to make a concrete difference to the mental wellbeing of emergency services staff: “Through our partnership of five local Minds we are working harder together to achieve better mental health for everybody. The Blue Light Programme is a Greater Manchester specific initiative to ensure that we can be there for those whose job is to be there for us.

“The Blue Light programme illustrates our commitment to find positive ways to make sure Greater Manchester’s emergency services staff feel valued, are able to live well and develop their full potential. We won’t give up until everyone experiencing a mental health problem gets support and respect.”

 

Mental Health in Greater Manchester

Mental health has been firmly on the public agenda in greater Manchester; last summer £134 million pounds was allocated to mental health services, with the ambition of putting mental health on ‘an equal footing’ with physical health. Part of this investment was used to set up the ‘Manchester resilience Hub’, which was launched to support the victims and families of last May’s arena bombing. One year on, those directly involved – including emergency services staff – may still be feeling the mental impact of such a traumatic event.

Furthermore, Mental Health Awareness Week, which took place last month, saw corporations in the region such as Barclays, Manchester Airports Group, PwC, Sellafield and United Utilities, support the ‘This is Me’ campaign, which encouraged staff to break the silence around mental health in the workplace.

 

 

Within the emergency services, recognition of staff mental health continues to grow, and there is an increased appetite for extra support services, as Wayne Norris, a Greater Manchester Firefighter and mental health activist explains:

“Over the past five years, attitudes towards mental health in our workplace have got a lot better, but it’ still vitally important to get the issue out there.

“We need to be able to walk in to work and tell someone what’s affecting us, and why it’s affecting us. Having Mind in Greater Manchester’s Blue Light Programme available is brilliant – hopefully it will help staff to improve their own mental health and continue speaking out.”

The Blue Light Programme is available now for any Greater Manchester emergency services employee or volunteer. To see the course details or to book on to a service, visit: https://www.gmmind.org.uk/blue-light-programme/  or contact Mind in Greater Manchester’s Blue Light team directly on 0161 212 6461 or by emailing bluelight@gmmind.org.uk . Alternatively, individuals can approach their Wellbeing or HR departments, who can discuss the most suitable options with them and make a referral.

What a success! Mindfulness in Mind host Birmingham retreat day

Friday, May 4th, 2018

Last week, Mind in Salford and Mind in Hackney hosted a free urban retreat day in Birmingham for Mind Network staff from all over the country. Delivered under the ‘Mindfulness in Mind’ banner, attendees learnt about how mindfulness is used to support mental wellbeing, engaged in group practices, and were given an introduction to the Practitioner Training Programme (PTP).

We would like to say thank you to everyone who attended and express our appreciation for all the feedback we have received!

We were also extremely pleased to receive a video from leading Bangor University mindfulness practitioner, Eluned Gold, who produced an original presentaiton about the benefits of mindfulness during pregnancy and parenting.

 

 

About Mindfulness in Mind

Mindfulness in Mind, supported by national charity Mind, is the banner under which Mind in Salford and Mind in Hackney have delivered evidence-based 8 week mindfulness courses (MBSR – mindfulness based stress reduction, MBCT – mindfulness based cognitive therapy, MSC – mindful self-compassion) to the public since 2010.

 

Mindfulness is now recognised by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) as an effective treatment option for depression and has been clinically evidenced to significantly reduce the symptoms of anxiety and stress. That is why we at Mindfulness in Mind believe it should be made available to anyone who experiences mental health issues.

 

Mindfulness in Mind also run the Practitioner Training Programme (PTP), a recognised 12 month pathway, which provides the foundation for seeking registration with the UK Network for Mindfulness Teachers. We train fellow Mind colleagues, counsellors, CBT therapists, mental health practitioners and educators from all over the UK to deliver 8 week mindfulness courses. During the programme participants will be given guidance on submitting their application for registration with the UK Network and supported to attain the levels of competency outlined in the Good Practice Guidelines (GPGs).

 

Thanks again to all of our retreat day attendees, and if you want to learn more about mindfulness or book on to the Practitioner Training Programme Visit mindinsalford.org.uk/mindfulness. Deadline for PTP applications is 1 July.

Job Vacancy: Trustee, Mind in Salford

Thursday, April 19th, 2018

Role: Trustee (voluntary, unpaid)

Location: Salford, Greater Manchester

Mind in Salford is on an amazing journey, can you help us with the next stage?

Mind in Salford is an independent, user focused charity providing quality services to make a positive difference to the wellbeing and mental health of the people of Salford.  We’ve been doing this since 1972, but over the last few years we’ve grown significantly and broadened the scope of our services.  We’re now looking to add two new trustees onto our board as we look to further increase our impact for the people of Salford.

As a trustee, you will be part of the team that leads the charity and decides how it is run.  You will attend our regular board meetings (currently monthly, on a Wednesday evening) and will undertake other work between meetings to support the staff team and keep the work of the board moving forward.

You will be excited by the opportunity to make a positive difference to the Charity and the people we serve.  Whatever your background, experience and skills, if you think you have something to offer we want to hear from you.

 

How to find out more about Mind in Salford

 

Mind in Salford Twitter

 

Charity Commission – information about Mind in Salford

 

How to find out more about being a charity trustee

 

Charity Commission – Charity trustee: what’s involved

 

Information from Reach

 

How to apply

 

Please send a current CV and a short covering letter (no more than 2 pages) explaining why you want to be a trustee for Mind in Salford and how you expect to be able to contribute.  Please submit your application to markus@mindinsalford.org.uk as soon as possible.

 

Become a certified mindfulness teacher on the Mindfulness in Mind Practitioner Training Programme (PTP)

Monday, March 5th, 2018

Want to become a Mindfulness Teacher?  Our new Mind Practitioner Training Programme (PTP) prospectus is now available for the Mindfulness in Mind Practitioner Training Programme (PTP) starting in September 2018 – You can view and download the prospectus here.

The Mindfulness in Mind Practitioner Training Programme (PTP) is a 12 month part-time fully supervised training pathway.  Mindfulness in Mind is an affiliated training organisation of the UK Network for Mindfulness Based Teachers, upholding the Good Practice Guidelines (GPGs).

“The excellent teaching and supportive attitudes of others are really reassuring. Such a range of personal backgrounds and life experiences on the course demonstrates how mindfulness can be beneficial for everyone.” – PTP Student

You can train on the PTP via our Northern Hub (Greater Manchester) or our Southern Hub (London)

The fees for the PTP can be paid by monthly instalments to spread the cost and the income from the PTP supports Mind to continue to deliver free 8 week mindfulness courses to people with mental health conditions on low or no income in the local community.

For a PTP application pack or further details contact: suzanne@mindinsalford.org.uk or call 0161 212 6441/4880   https://www.mindinsalford.org.uk/mindfulness/

 

My Mental Health Story – Martin O’Doherty

Thursday, February 1st, 2018

Hello everyone, my name is Martin and I was diagnosed with OCD when I was 27. Having lived with what I knew were bizarre thoughts, silly fears and avoiding the things that set off my anxiety for 17 years already, I just thought I was a little weird, or different! I never quite understood why I’d get ‘bad thoughts’ or ‘weird thoughts’ and just considered myself some random anomaly. I’d never heard of the term ‘intrusive thoughts’ until I became unwell myself. If you too haven’t they are very unpleasant, unwanted and involuntary thoughts that are ego dystonic in nature. Ego dystonic means that the content of the thoughts is contrary to who you are! They are distressing, terrifying and awful to live with.

I grew up in the north west of England, where I struggled with school, work, friends, you name it! My ‘thoughts’, or OCD as I now realise, had a knack of getting in the way of everything. That was until I applied to train as an Occupational Therapist in 2006. University had been therapeutic for me. I was immersed in studies about something I was passionate about (helping others) and I was so engrossed that my ‘bad thoughts’ didn’t seem to plague me as much. I graduated with first class honours and was proud as punch in my achievement too, having been told I would never amount to anything when I was school! Now I was going to be a mental health professional! Boy was I in for a shock when I realised I was going to end up being referred to as a “service user” rather than a mental health professional.

 

In 2010, my career crumbled. I became ill! I never thought this would happen to me. I thought that it was the kind of thing that happened to the ‘service users’ I’d planned to be the therapist for, or other people. Or just people who failed in life…Jeez I can’t believe I used to think that way! But I did!

My intrusive thoughts all centred upon harm coming to others, and me being directly responsible. It manifested through doubts on whether I’d contaminated friends and my family’s food or drinks. I couldn’t cope with the thoughts, or the doubts. They were always there. I’d only have to look at a bottle of household bleach and I’d be convinced I’d poured it into people’s food. The fear was paralysing. The last thing I’d ever want to do is harm someone, so why was I getting these awful thoughts in my head? I never heard of the term intrusive thoughts, and I certainly didn’t know about their ego dystonic nature, so I would get so anxious that I would throw away any food or drinks I was concerned about. I would shake, cry and rock back and forth, trying to figure out whether the thought of poisoning someone was a real memory, or my mind playing tricks on me. It eventually became easier to avoid food and drinks altogether.

Fast forward to 2013 and I started to make progress in my recovery. I began to open up about the intrusive thoughts that were keeping me in a state of fear and exhaustion. Doing this helped immensely, and I had no idea just how much it would!

The power that you can gain from disclosing what’s going on your head is truly remarkable. I went from being petrified of telling anybody my intrusive thoughts to enjoying the shock on the faces of those who I would open up to! They weren’t shocked because of the content of my thoughts, they were shocked because they too had been living with similar, and different intrusive thoughts. They thought they were the only one who had them! How wrong were they!

How do I manage my mental health now?

I am a believer that through using the power of disclosure, we can end the stigma associated with having ‘mental health’. Through it we can help others who struggle alone too. How many times have you worried what people will think if they could read the content of your thoughts? If people knew you were ‘mentally ill’ or couldn’t work for reasons associated with mental health! My guess is that you’ve lost count, as I had previously to disclosure!

In 2013 I decided to dedicate my life to helping others who had experienced OCD and lived with the terror of intrusive thoughts. I began running a support group for others who lived with OCD, and I for one can attest to how much it has helped, not only me but the many people I have met over the last 5 years of running it. I think everyone should join a support group. They can be so powerful! Just being around others who understand what you are going through, and have been there themselves is so reassuring. I’ve made lifelong friends along this journey and we support each other through the good and bad.

One of the most important aspects of my recovery journey though has been getting involved with Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust.

I was fortunate to meet my manager one day just by chance. She was setting up what she referred to as “the Recovery Academy”. She explained to me that it was a college of sorts where courses would be cofacilitated and coproduced by experts by experience and mental health professionals! It was all aimed at combatting stigma, breaking down misconceptions and educating anyone who wanted to know more. As soon as I heard this I committed to working for her and wrote a whole course about my experience of living with OCD. In it I openly discuss the content of my intrusive thoughts and how it affects me on a day to day basis alongside a Cognitive Behavioural Therapist. This course has been a platform for sharing my message of hope to hundreds of people across the north west. It has enabled me to use my experience of despair for a greater good, and that’s what I think we all should do. Use your story to inspire others and shape a new understanding of mental health. Tell people that everyone experiences odd thoughts, and they don’t mean you are odd! Experiencing intrusive thoughts and ‘mental health’ doesn’t mean you’re weak, it doesn’t mean you’re a failure…it means you’re human! We all have mental health and we all get intrusive thoughts, so let’s stamp out this stigma associated with it!

 

We would like to say a massive thank you to Martin for sharing his story with us for #TimetoTalkDay 2018. Martin also runs a great blog called ‘Overcoming Anxiety‘, where he talks about his personal experiences and gives others advice on coping mechanisms. You can also find Martin’s Facebook page here, and his Twitter here.

A massive thank you! Local fundraiser, Ethan Evans, raises £1,411 for Mind in Salford

Thursday, January 18th, 2018

fundraising, mind, mental health, charity, get involved

We would like to say an overdue thank you to fundraiser, Ethan Evans, who has been tirelessly helping to raise money for Mind in Salford over the last year, amounting to an incredible total of £1,411!

Ethan’s endeavours have seen him raise funds for charities all over Salford and Greater Manchester such as, St Anne’s Hospice, Narrowgate Homeless Shelter and Emmaus Salford, collecting thousands of pounds and making a real difference to the lives of people in his community.

In recognition of his achievements, Ethan has received a British Citizen’s Award (BCA) in the category of ‘Young Achievers’ – a well-deserved accolade and display of appreciation for all the hard work that he has put in over the years.

We feel privileged that Ethan selected us as one of his charities, and can assure him that the money raised is contributing to providing vital mental health services in Salford. We wish you the best of luck for your future, Ethan, thanks so much!

Mindline Trans+ 0300 330 5468

Tuesday, January 9th, 2018

Mindline Trans+ is a new helpline dedicated to supporting those who identify as trans, non-binary or gender fluid, providing a safe space for users to express their concerns and seek support surrounding mental health.

We provide a safe place to talk about your feelings confidentially. We don’t record calls nor ask for any personal details. Our listeners will try understand the multitude of feelings concerns, that may be going on for you to listen and offer  support.

Want to know more about Mindline Trans+?  Join the community on Facebook.